Finance Bill 2022-23

The Finance Bill is a government bill intended to give lasting statutory effect to the tax measures announced in the November 2022 autumn statement. The bill completed its passage through the House of Commons, unamended, on 30 November 2022 and was introduced in the House of Lords on 1 December 2022. A second reading debate is due to take place in the House of Lords on 20 December 2022.

Finance Bill 2022-23
  • Research Briefing

    Protection for Whistleblowing Bill [HL]: HL Bill 27 of 2022–23

    The Protection for Whistleblowing Bill [HL] would introduce several protections for whistleblowers, including the establishment of an independent Office of the Whistleblower. The bill would also create offences relating to the treatment of whistleblowers and the handling of whistleblowing cases. It would also repeal the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998.

  • Research Briefing

    Health Promotion Bill [HL]: HL Bill 24 of 2022–23

    The Health Promotion Bill [HL] is a private member’s bill introduced by Lord Addington (Liberal Democrat) seeking to amend the name and focus of the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities. For example, it would require the newly defined office to work collaboratively with other departments on a national plan for sport. This follows recommendations from the National Plan for Sport and Recreation Committee intended to improve levels of physical activity in the country.

  • Research Briefing

    Public Order Bill: HL Bill 61 of 2022–23

    This government bill would introduce powers to address protestors that cause serious disruption. This includes new criminal offences such as those relating to: locking on; tunnelling; obstructing major transport works; interfering with key national infrastructure; and interfering with the access to, or provision of, abortion services. The bill would also introduce serious disruption prevention orders, as well as give the secretary of state the power to bring civil proceedings against those causing serious disruption as a result of protest-related activities. The bill has proven controversial, with some arguing that it could threaten the right to protest. The government states that the bill would plug what it argues are gaps in existing legislation to better protect the public from serious disruption caused by protestors.

  • Research Briefing

    Electronic Trade Documents Bill [HL]: HL Bill 57 of 2022–23

    The Electronic Trade Documents Bill [HL] provides for certain digital trade documents to be put on the same legal footing as their paper counterparts. It implements the recommendations made by the Law Commission in March 2022. The bill was introduced in the House of Lords by Lord Kamall (Conservative) on 12 October 2022. The second reading of the bill is due to take place on 7 November 2022.

  • Research Briefing

    Energy Prices Bill 2022–23

    The Energy Prices Bill would enact several policies the government announced in September 2022 to reduce the cost of energy for consumers. The bill would put in place the ‘energy price guarantee’, which would limit the cost of electricity and gas per unit for domestic consumers. This was initially planned to run for two years, however on 17 October 2022 the government announced it would be reduced to six months. The bill is scheduled to have its second reading in the House of Lords on 19 October 2022.

  • Research Briefing

    Health and Social Care Levy (Repeal) Bill

    The Health and Social Care Levy (Repeal) Bill would repeal the Health and Social Care Levy Act 2021 while maintaining a legislative basis for keeping tax receipts collected under provisions in that act until early November 2022. The House of Commons considered the bill at second reading and all remaining stages on 11 October 2022. The House of Lords is scheduled to similarly consider the bill on 17 October 2022.

  • Research Briefing

    Northern Ireland Protocol Bill: HL Bill 52 of 2022–23

    The Northern Ireland Protocol Bill is due to have its second reading in the House of Lords on 11 October 2022. It would exclude some provisions of the Northern Ireland Protocol from applying in domestic law. The government says this is justified by necessity and consistent with international law, but others have disagreed. The bill’s wide use of delegated powers has also been criticised.

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